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Titel
Bumblebees require visual pollen stimuli to initiate and multimodal stimuli to complete a full behavioral sequence in close-range flower orientation
VerfasserWilmsen, Saskia ; Gottlieb, Robin ; Junker, Robert R. ; Lunau, Klaus
Erschienen in
Ecology and Evolution, Hoboken, 2017, Jg. 7, H. 5, S. 1384-1393
ErschienenWiley, 2017
SpracheEnglisch
DokumenttypAufsatz in einer Zeitschrift
Schlagwörter (EN)Bombus terrestris / bumblebee / flower recognition / multimodal stimuli / pollen / stamen mimicry
ISSN2045-7758
URNurn:nbn:at:at-ubs:3-6570 Persistent Identifier (URN)
Zugriffsbeschränkung
 Das Werk ist frei verfügbar
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Bumblebees require visual pollen stimuli to initiate and multimodal stimuli to complete a full behavioral sequence in close-range flower orientation [0.92 mb]
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Zusammenfassung (Englisch)

Flower visits are complex encounters, in which animals are attracted by floral signals, guided toward the site of the first physical contact with a flower, land, and finally take up floral rewards. At close range, signals of stamens and pollen play an important role to facilitate flower handling in bees, yet the pollen stimuli eliciting behavioral responses are poorly known. In this study, we test the response of flower-naive bumblebees (Bombus terrestris) toward single and multimodal pollen stimuli as compared to natural dandelion pollen. As artificial pollen stimuli, we used the yellow flavonoid pigment quercetin, the scent compound eugenol, the amino acid proline, the monosaccharide glucose, and the texture of pollen-grain-sized glass pellets as a tactile stimulus. Three test stimuli, dandelion pollen, one out of various uni- and multimodal stimulus combinations, and a solvent control were presented simultaneously to individual bumblebees, whose response was recorded. The results indicate that bumblebees respond in an irreversible sequence of behavioral reactions. Bumblebees approached the visual stimulus quercetin as often as natural dandelion pollen. An additional olfactory stimulus resulted in slightly more frequent landings. The multimodal stimulus combinations including visual, olfactory, gustatory, and tactile stimuli elicited approaches, antennal contacts, and landings as often as natural pollen. Subsequent reactions like proboscis extension, mandible biting, and buzzing were more often but not regularly observed at dandelion pollen. Our study shows that visual signals of pollen are sufficient to trigger initial responses of bumblebees, whereas multimodal pollen stimuli elicit full behavioral response as compared to natural pollen. Our results suggest a major role of pollen cues for the attraction of bees toward flowers and also explain, why many floral guides mimic the visual signals of pollen and anthers, that is, the yellow and UV-absorbing color, to direct bumblebees toward the site where they access the floral rewards.

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CC-BY-Lizenz (4.0)Creative Commons Namensnennung 4.0 International Lizenz