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Titel
Subcellular sequestration and impact of heavy metals on the ultrastructure and physiology of the multicellular freshwater alga Desmidium swartzii
VerfasserAndosch, Ancuela ; Höftberger, Margit ; Lütz, Cornelius ; Lütz-Meindl, Ursula
Erschienen in
International Journal of Molecular Sciences, Basel, 2015, Jg. 2015, H. 16, S. 10389-10410
ErschienenMultidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute, 2015
SpracheEnglisch
DokumenttypAufsatz in einer Zeitschrift
Schlagwörter (EN)aluminum / cadmium / chromium / Desmidium_swartzii / electron_energy / loss_spectroscopy / TEM / zinc
ISSN1422-0067
URNurn:nbn:at:at-ubs:3-1352 Persistent Identifier (URN)
DOI10.3390/ijms160510389 
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Subcellular sequestration and impact of heavy metals on the ultrastructure and physiology of the multicellular freshwater alga Desmidium swartzii [8.07 mb]
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Zusammenfassung (Englisch)

Due to modern life with increasing traffic, industrial production and agricultural practices, high amounts of heavy metals enter ecosystems and pollute soil and water. As a result, metals can be accumulated in plants and particularly in algae inhabiting peat

bogs of low pH and high air humidity. In the present study, we investigated the impact and intracellular targets of aluminum, copper, cadmium, chromium VI and zinc on the filamentous green alga Desmidium swartzii, which is an important biomass producer in acid peat bogs. By means of transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) it is shown that all metals examined are taken up into Desmidium readily, where they are sequestered in cell walls and/or intracellular compartments. They cause effects on cell ultrastructure to different degrees and additionally disturb photosynthetic activity and biomass production. Our study shows a clear correlation between toxicity of a metal and

the ability of the algae to compartmentalize it intracellularly. Cadmium and chromium, which are not compartmentalized, exert the most toxic effects. In addition, this study shows that the filamentous alga Desmidium reacts more sensitively to aluminum and zinc when compared to its unicellular relative Micrasterias, indicating a severe threat to the ecosystem.